The Crescent Report

April 21, 2010

MAS Freedom Justice Activist Joins North Carolina’s Stand Against Racism Day

Filed under: From the Desk of Imam Mahdi Bray — Imam Mahdi Bray @ 10:36 am

Kudos to the Governor of the state of North Carolina for having a ‘Stand against Racism’ Day. While the Governors of Mississippi, Haley Barbour, and Virginia, Bob McDonnell, are engaged in old southern politics by commemorating confederate history month. Governor Bev Perdue of North Carolina has chosen to move in a different direction. Kudos to Governor Bev Perdue for her ‘Stand against Racism’ Day. Check out the piece below.

Imam Mahdi Bray

Quote of the Day: “We are like many fibers woven into a garment of human mutuality.”

MAS Freedom Justice Activist Joins North Carolina’s Stand Against Racism Day

North Carolina Governor Bev Perdue and Raleigh, North Carolina Mayor Charles Meeker have designated April 30, 2010 as YWCA Stand Against Racism Day in the state. Join the YWCA, over 2,000 groups across the nation, and over a quarter of a million individuals participating in this movement.

Meet us on Friday, April 30th, 11 am at the YWCA, 554 E. Hargett St, in Raleigh. The group will then march a few blocks to Moore Square in Downtown Raleigh for a one-hour program beginning at noon.

This special event will feature a beautiful program with Dr. David Forbes, a former leader of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and students from the Moore Square Museum Magnet Middle School. SNCC was instrumental in organizing the sit-in demonstrations in 1960 that led to the racial desegregation of public institutions and facilities in North Carolina.

Khalilah Sabra, the National Immigration Rights Coordinator of Muslim American Society Freedom (MAS Freedom), commented that, “It is important for Muslims in North Carolina to join hands with the African-American community in standing against the rising tide of racism and anti-immigrant rhetoric that is clearly on the rise in North Carolina and the nation.  We urge the Muslim community to join in this important event, and to continue to build stronger alliances within our community and with other communities in North Carolina who are organizing for freedom and social justice for all people.”

She went on to say that “While the Governors of Mississippi and Virginia celebrate Confederate History Month, we send special kudos to Governor Bev Perdue for taking a principled stand to oppose the history of racism and slavery that, unfortunately, other public officials in the South seem ready to commemorate.”

It’s not too late to sign up! Visit www.StandAgainstRacism.org to join the movement. Click “Become a Participating Site.” Your group’s Stand can be anything you want that resists racism: a time of silence, reading anti-racist quotes, highlight a program in your organization, a march, public art, or creating a small discussion group-the process is flexible and united together, we can become a powerful symbol of equality.

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1 Comment »

  1. THIS MOMENTOUS DAY!

    Not one day in anyone’s life is an uneventful day, no day without profound meaning, no matter how dull and boring it might seem, no matter whether you are a seamstress or a queen, a shoeshine boy or a movie star, a renowned philosopher or a Down’s syndrome child.

    Because in every day of your life, there are opportunities to perform little kindnesses for others, both by conscious acts of will and unconscious example.

    Each smallest act of kindness – even just words of hope when they are needed, the remembrance of a birthday, a compliment that engenders a smile – reverberates across great distances and spans of time, affecting lives unknown to the one whose generous spirit was the source of this good echo, because kindness is passed on and grows each time it’s passed, until a simple courtesy becomes an act of selfless courage years later and far away.

    Likewise, each small meanness, each thoughtless expression of hatred, each envious and bitter act, regardless of how petty, can inspire others, and is therefore the seed that ultimately produces evil fruit, poisoning people whom you have never met and never will.

    All human lives are so profoundly and intricately entwined – those dead, those living, those generations yet to come – that the fate of all is the fate of each, and the hope of humanity rests in every heart and in every pair of hands.

    Therefore, after every failure, we are obliged to strive again for success, and when faced with the end of one thing, we must build something new and better in the ashes, just as from pain and grief, we must weave hope, for each of us is a thread critical to the strength – the very survival – of the human tapestry.

    Every hour in every life contains such often-unrecognized potential to affect the world that the great days for which we, in our dissatisfaction, so often yearn are already with us; all great days and thrilling possibilities are combined always in THIS MOMENTOUS DAY! – Rev. H.R. White

    Excerpt from Dean Koontz’s book, “From the Corner of His Eye”.

    It embodies the idea of how the smallest of acts can have such a profound effect on each of our lives.

    Comment by Benito — April 27, 2010 @ 8:46 pm


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