The Crescent Report

May 3, 2010

MAS Freedom Representative Joins UN Secretary General in Addressing the International Nuclear Abolition Conference

Filed under: From the Desk of Imam Mahdi Bray — Imam Mahdi Bray @ 1:11 pm

The need for Muslims to call for the abolition of all nuclear weapons is both a spiritual and moral imperative.  MAS Freedom has made the abolition of all nuclear weapons part of its 12-Point Legislative Agenda.  We don’t need a nuclear weapon freeze.  What we need is a world that is nuclear weapon free.  Check out below my “homeboy” Ibrahim’s stand up position at the International Nuclear Abolition Conference.  Imam Mahdi Bray

Quote of the Day: “…And if anyone saves a life it will be as if he saved the life of all of humanity…” (Holy Quran – 5:32)

MAS Freedom Representative Joins UN Secretary General in Addressing the International Nuclear Abolition Conference

MASF Commitment to Nuclear Abolition Receives Rousing Ovation From Conference Participants

On April 30th, at the historic Riverside Church in Manhattan, New York, more than 1,000 leaders and representatives of leading international organizations gathered at the historic Riverside Church in New York City to convene at an International Conference for a Nuclear-Free, Peaceful, Just, and Sustainable World.

Attendees at the conference included the Secretary General of the United Nations, distinguished mayors and parliamentarians from Japan, and other civil society leaders from Brazil, Russia, Sweden, and the United States. Also, invited to give a plenary speech to the assembled delegates was, Ibrahim Ramey, MAS Freedom Civil and Human Rights Program Director. Ramey spoke on the topic of the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the relationship between the historic struggle for civil rights and civil liberties in the United States to the global demand for the abolition of nuclear weapons.

During the month of May, 2010, leaders from more than 100 nations will converge on the United Nations to discuss the 40th anniversary review of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.  This document, a central element of international law, was ratified by the United States Senate in 1970.  But key elements of the NPT have yet to be implemented by the nuclear weapons states, and especially the United States.

Ibrahim Ramey is no stranger to the issue of nuclear weapons policy and abolition.  From 1995 to 2006, Ibrahim directed disarmament work for the national Fellowship of Reconciliation, where he organized extensively on the disarmament issue and participated in direct non violent actions at a number of nuclear weapons laboratories, test sites, and military bases.

He is also one of the founding members of the U.S. Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons. In 2005, he led a Fellowship of Reconciliation delegation to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the atomic bombings of those cities.

Ramey was the only Muslim invited to give a plenary speech at the event.  (Read more here)

He noted that “The legacy of Dr. King reminds us of the moral imperative to demilitarize the United States and the entire world, and to bring the values of faith and compassion into the political movement for disarmament.  Muslims, like people of all faith communities, need to be a leading element in creating the sense of urgency required to abolish nuclear weapons.”  The text of the entire speech can be found at : http://iamramey.blogspot.com

He also noted that “I was deeply pleased to note that the point of my speech that received the loudest applause was my mention of MAS Freedom’s sponsoring of a Capitol Hill forum on nuclear abolition last November, and point 12 of the MAS Freedom Legislative Agenda, which affirms our Islamic faith-based support for the total abolition of nuclear weapons.” (MAS Freedom Legislative Agenda)

Ramey will also be a featured speaker or three other interfaith panels to be held at the United Nations during the month-long Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference in May.

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